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Part III, Page 30
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Part III: U.S.-China Common Issues

30. General Perceptions of Mutual Issues

Greatest Concerns
US Survey
(BOTH SURVEYS) What are your two greatest concerns about U.S.-China relations?
Loss of U.S. jobs to China
U.S. trade deficit with China
China's human rights situation (US survey)/The implementation of Chinese people's legal rights (China survey)
China's environment degradation
China's exchange rate policy
China's military modernization
China's energy consumption
Cultural differences
U.S. military presence in Asia
China's intellectual property infringement
China's responsibility in resolving the Darfur problem
Taiwan
Other
Not Sure
*Percentages total more than 100% as respondents were asked to select the top two responses.
China Survey
(BOTH SURVEYS) What are your two greatest concerns about U.S.-China relations?
Loss of U.S. jobs to China
U.S. trade deficit with China
China's human rights situation (US survey)/The implementation of Chinese people's legal rights (China survey)
China's environment degradation
China's exchange rate policy
China's military modernization
China's energy consumption
Cultural differences
U.S. military presence in Asia
China's intellectual property infringement
China's responsibility in resolving the Darfur problem
Taiwan
Other
Not Sure
*Percentages total more than 100% as respondents were asked to select the top two responses.

Narrative Analysis

United States:
  • The two greatest concerns about U.S.-China relations among the general public are the loss of U.S. jobs to China (41%) and the U.S. trade deficit with China (35%). These same two concerns are also the top two choices for business leaders (39% and 33%, respectively). Opinion Leaders hold those same two issues as most important, but in the reverse order-U.S. trade deficit (50%) and loss of jobs (31%).
  • Congressional staffers are evenly divided among four issues: U.S. trade deficit (27%), China's military modernization (26%), China's human rights (25%) and China's energy consumption (24%).
  • Democrats (43%) and Republicans (48%) are most likely to cite the loss of U.S. jobs as the top issue, while Independents (37%) see the U.S. trade deficit as the greatest concern.
  • Among opinion leaders, the trade deficit ranks as the most important issue, especially for those in the public sector (60%) and those in the media (50%).
China:
  • All three samples are most concerned about Taiwan, with 59% of opinion leaders, 53% of business leaders and 40% of the general public citing this issue. In addition, opinion leaders (35%) and business leaders (33%) are also deeply concerned with the U.S. trade deficit with China, while the general public (20%) is more concerned about China's environmental degradation.
  • The Taiwan issue unites the opinion of people with all levels of education, as it is of most concern to these samples of the general public.
  • Younger Chinese between 18–29 are more concerned about the Taiwan problem, U.S. trade deficit with China, and Chinese exchange rate policy than other age groups.
  • Opinion leaders from the academia are especially concerned about the Taiwan problem, while leaders in the media are more likely to worry about the implementation of Chinese people's legal rights.